Advisory   If you arrived here by any means other than from the Index of Impacts,
it is suggested that you start at the Introduction to gain an understanding of what follows.

Barringer Crater

Barringer Crater Location, between Flagstaff and Winslow, Arizona.
     Barringer Crater is located in Arizona State between Flagstaff and Winslow. It is included here because it is a confirmed impact crater and it is small enough that the effects of this impact can be studied on the ground and then be compared to the other impacts. 
Barringer Crater, possible rays from the blast of the meteor.
     A very wide view of the area shows lines in the geography radiating from the impact site. These were most likely caused by meteor fragments that blasted off when the meteor hit the ground. The direction of these rays also suggests that the meteor came in from the southwest. This image is from an apparent altitude of about 300 miles. The image is linked to a larger image for more definition.

Barringer Crater marking the center of the crater.
     The crater is about 0.36  miles in radius, or 0.72 miles in diameter, just over 1 km. The center has been marked and surveyed many times, but is generally taken as the center of the best fit circle, as shown above. However it is not just the crater that defines this impact. The impact produced circular seismic waves in the surrounding earth which reformed the Earth according to those waves.                    
Barringer Crater marking the center of impact, southwest of the center of the crater.
     In this image the Center of Impact is marked, to the Southwest of the Center of the Crater at 550 feet distance. The Center of Impact is determined by the wave circles that are found outside of the crater. These seismic waves produced concentric circles, which are shown below, all centered at the Center of Impact. The reason that the two points are different is that the meteor did not come in straight down, but at an angle. In this case the line between the two centers runs from Southwest to Northeast.

Barringer Crater shown with the ejecta pattern in line with the line between the center of impact and the center of the crater, and the first shock wave circle at 1.24 miles radius.
      With a wider view the ejecta pattern can be seen. The yellow line describes the pattern from Southwest to Northeast, in the same direction as the line between the two center points. This indicates that the meteor came in from the Southwest. The Center of Impact then, would be the place where the meteor first hit the Earth. The larger circle at 1.24 miles radius, shows the first instance of the seismic circles from the impact. These seismic waves radiate out from the center in concentric circles, similar to the ripples in the water if you throw a stone into a still pond.                 
Barringer Crater, the 1.24 mile radius shock wave is shown to the northeast by the road that follows the contour of the land and a water impound on the line.
      To the Northeast of the impact site at 1.24 miles radius, the road takes advantage of the terrain of the circular wave. Note the water impoundment at the top of the image, left of center.
      It is quite interesting to note that while the seismic wave formed the ground in its' circular manner, man has taken advantage of these land forms with no prior knowledge that the landforms were the result of an impact, and has used them in many ways to his advantage. The engineers, the designers, the builders of our modern world have found that these sites were the best suited for the purposes.
Barringer Crater, the 1.24 mile radius shock wave is shown to the northeast by the road intersection and land contours that parallel the circle line.
      To the Northwest, the road turns and forks right on the circle. Also note the line on the land just outside of the circle.
Barringer Crater, the 1.24 mile radius shock wave is shown to the southeast by a water impound at the circle line.
      To the Southeast at 1.24 miles radius, is another water impoundment.


Barringer Crater, the 7 mile shock wave circle in its entirety.
      At 7 miles radius, the seismic wave left its marks.              
Barringer Crater, the 7 mile shock wave circle to the northwest, formed the valley where a creek flows and Interstate 40 was built with an interchange on the circle line.
      At 7 miles to the Northwest, along the 7 mile seismic wave circle line, the creek follows the valley of the wave and an intersection with Interstate 40 was engineered and built specifically here, on the circle line.
On the Barringer Crater 7 mile shock wave circle to the west southwest is some work for the development of water resources
     At 7miles to the West southwest there is some development of water facilities.
On the Barringer Crater 7 mile shock wave circle to the southwest is a watering hole.
     At 7 miles to the Southwest there is a watering hole. This is the same watering hole as shown in the image below.
On the Barringer Crater 7 mile shock wave circle to the south southwest a dry creek bed follows the circle line.
    To the South southwest the geography follows the line. This is the valley of a dry creek bed.
On the Barringer Crater 7 mile shock wave circle to the ease southeast, a creek bed follows the circle to another watering hole.
      To the Ease southeast, the creek bed follows the line to another watering hole (top, left of center).
On the Barringer Crater 7 mile shock wave circle to the northeast, Interstate 40 crosses a creek with an interchange.
      To the Northeast at 7 miles Interstate 40 crosses the creek directly on the line, and the intersection is right beside it. These things were surveyed and engineered with no knowledge of this seismic circle.

Barringer Crater, the 20 mile shock wave circle in its entirety.
     At 20 miles radius the seismic circle cuts through Winslow, Arizona. To the Northeast is the Little Colorado River. To the Southeast is Clear Creek. This image is linked to a large, hi res image for increased detail.
      Starting to the Northwest.....                     
On the Barringer Crater 20 mile shock wave circle to the northwest a dry creek bed follows the circle for 7 miles.
     At 20 miles to the Northwest, the dry creek bed follows the circle closely for about 7 miles.
On the Barringer Crater 20 mile shock wave circle to the northeast the Little Colorado River follows the circle.
      The Little Colorado River following the line for 4.2 miles to the Northeast.
On the Barringer Crater 20 mile shock wave circle to the northeast, a bridge over the Little Colorado River.
      At 20 miles Northwest a bridge crosses the Little Colorado River.
At Winslow Arizona, Interstate 40, State Route 87 and 99 cross the Little Colorado River as does the railroad on the circle.
     Historic Route 66 ( Interstate 40) and State Route 87 and 99 cross the Little Colorado River at Winslow, as does the railroad at the 20 mile circle.
From Winslow Arizona, Clear Creek follows the circle to the Southeast nearly 28 miles to Silgreaves National Forest on the same 20 mile radius
     To the Southeast from Winslow, Arizona on the same 20 mile radius, Clear Creek follows the circle nearly 28 miles to Silgreaves National Forest.


      At 37.5 Miles Radius a very interesting seismic circle.             
Through Flagstaff, Arizona this 37.5 mile radius shock wave from the Barringer Meteor created a valley in which Flagstaff and all the major facilities of the city follow the line precisely.
      The image above is through central Flagstaff. The white line is the 37.5 mile radius line. This is attached to a larger image where you will see that the primary facilities constructed in Flagstaff were built on the center of the valley created by this seismic circle.
From Flagstaff, Arizona south, Interstate 17 follows the shock wave circle for 27 miles.
     South of the airport, the road follows the circle line for 27 miles. This is Interstate 17.
On the Barringer Crater 37.5 mile shock wave circle to the southeast is Chevelon Canyon Lake Reservoir.
      At 37 miles to the South southeast is Chevelon Canyon Lake Reservoir.
At Joseph City to the east at 37.5 miles is an interchange for Interstate 40, and just to the north of that some mining activity.
      To the East, there is the main highway intersection at Joseph City, and major mining activity to the North, each at about one mile to the west of the circle.


Holbrook, Arizona at 50 miles radius east from Barringer Crater, the junction of highways, railroads, bridges over the Little Colorado River, and airports define the valley of this shock wave circle.
      At 50 miles West, is the city of Holbrook, Az. where State Routes 180 and 77 join to cross the Little Colorado River. Just to the West of that bridge is the railway crossing bridge. Just to the north of the city is the intersection of Route 66 (Interstate 40) and the northbound 180 and 77.  Just North and West of the intersection is the old airport, and the new airport is North of that between the circle line and the Interstate.                             
Between Payson and Heber Arizona, Willow Springs Lake, a man made reservoir is on the valley of the 50 mile radius circle.
     Along the Payson-Heber Highway is Willow Springs Lake, a man made reservoir.
Between Payson and Heber Arizona, the main highway follows the geography formed by this shock wave circle to the south southeast of Barringer Crater.
     To the South, the Payson-Heber Highway, AKA Rim Road follows the 50 mile seismic wave circle for 25 miles.

The Barringer Crater 60 mile shock wave circle in its entirety with numerous alignments marked.
     The 60 mile radius seismic wave circle is shown in its entirety, with numerous deformations of the land marked by the arrows. This image is linked to a larger image
(4,800 pixels width) for increased definition. This image is at an apparent altitude of 230 miles.

The Barringer Crater 81 mile shock wave circle, the southern part with numerous alignments marked.
     The southern section of this 81 mile radius seismic circle of the Barringer Crater. It is linked to an image 4,800 pixels in width for increased definition. Many of the geographical
formations caused by the seismic wave are arrowed. As this image is effectively from an altitude of 225 miles, being able to see this formation at that distance gives an idea as
to the energy involved in this impact. A closer examination of this circle will show all forms of human endeavor; roads, reservoirs, railroads, airports, cities and more as well as
the natural features of river/stream valleys, and other geographical phenomena which clearly define this circle.

Through Lake Powell east of Las Vegas, Nevada the 187 mile radius shock wave can be seen easily at an apparent altitude of 187 miles.
     This formation is at 187 miles to the northwest of the crater, on Lake Mead, east of Las Vegas, Nevada.           
Past Gila Bend, Arizona the passing of the 187 mile radius shock wave can be seen easily at 110 miles apparent altitude.
     At 187 miles to the Southwest there are these alignments near Gila Bend, Arizona.

Past Elko, Nevada and the Great Salt Lake in Utah the Humboldt River follows the valley of the 473 mile radius shock wave line for 110 miles. The line is clearly visible at 265 miles apparent altitude.
     Past the Great Salt Lake in Utah and Elko, Nevada the Humboldt River follows the valley of the 473 mile radius seismic circle for 110 miles to the northwest of the impact.
The line is clearly visible at 265 miles apparent altitude.                                
Past Denver, Colorado to the northeast at 473 miles the shock wave alignments are visible at an apparent 260 miles altitude.
      Past Denver, Colorado to the northeast at 473 miles the seismic circle alignments are visible at an apparent 260 miles altitude. These alignments are at 473 miles distance to the northwest form the impact site. This demonstrates that the seismic waves caused by these impacts continue through the land for very long distances.

     This image is the same circle as other 473 mile radius images above, but to the Southwest through Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains of Sonora and Chihuahua, Mexico. It covers about 400 miles of the circle. This image is linked to a larger image (4800 pixels wide) for a closer examination of the effects of the seismic wave. The yellow arrows denote the majority of them.

     There is evidence of other seismic circles and geographical alignments than those shown here, both closer and farther away. However to show all of them is not the object here, rather it is to demonstrate the effects of a meteor impact outside of the actual impact site.

     If an asteroid the size of the Barringer Meteor caused seismic seismic circles at this distance, then larger impacts would make larger seismic circles. Sometimes these seismic circles can be seen extending for thousands of miles, forming these alignments in concentric circles that can be traced across six continents, Antarctica being too snow covered for analysis.  As is evident here, the geographical alignments of these seismic circles are precise.

     As they can be seen in concentric circles across six continents,  then their placement would be a measure of continental drift. If these concentric circles are not broken, then if there was continental drift and Pangaea, they must have happened before any of the impacts took place. If there is continental drift, then these lines will not connect continent to continent
.


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Introduction
©2012, 2015 Terry Westerman