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Kauhajoki, Finland

A meteor impact at Kauhajoki, Finland formed the southern coast of Finland
     The southern coast of Finland was formed by a seismic circle from a meteor impact centered at  62°25'34.87"N , 22° 8'2.75"E, just west of the town of Kauhajoki, Finland. This seismic circle has a radius of 294 kilometers. There is no apparent crater. The center of impact is shown in the image driectly below.  More detailed images of this seismic circle are to the right. Images with a blue border are linked to larger images for a more detailed assessment.

A meteor impact at Kauhajoki, Finland formed the southern coast of Finland
     This is an expanded virw of the 294 km radius seismic circle.
The southern coast of Finland is part of a 294 kilometer seismic circle.
    A closer viewof the southern coast.
Helsinki lies on the 294 km seismic circle.
     Closing in on Helsinki, the circle line is definate. This image is linked to a larger image.
Seismic circles  often have highly engineered structures built on them
     Through Helsinki, a numberof the cities main engineered and architecturally designed works lie directly on this seismic circle. This is not unusual, and is found in many places. Hong Kong is another example where a 3080 km seismic circle from the Himalayan Impact provided form to the city
When the seismic wave passes, rivers are often re-routed in convoluted forms.
     Through the city of Kouvola, it seems that the seismic wave changed the course of the river.
Mines and airports are often found on or very near a seismic circle line.
      To the East, it appears that the seismic wave exposed some mineral deposits, which would account for the mining operations here. Also note the airport on the same line. Finding mineral deposits along these circle lines is common as the passingwave is a Raleigh wave, which flpis many rock formations. The video on the Gibraltar page shows this nicely. The Flatirons near Boulder Colorado, U.S.A. are a striking example of this.
When the wave passes softer ground, it loosens the earth, which allows rivers to form a path.
     To the Northeast, the river valley follows the line.
Four dams near Eden, Sweden.
     To the Northwest near Eden, Sweden, the river and lakes runs for 35 kilometers. This river was dammed four times along this stretch.
These 16 kilometers show considerable development.
     Soderhamn, along the eastern coast of Sweden. Along this part of the circle lies a main highway, a primary intersection, the center of Soderhamn, and airport and two marinas.


The center of impact, just west of the town of Kauhajoki, Finland.
      The center of impact is where the meteor first hit the ground, and thus is the center of the concentric seismic circles of the impact. If a crater had been formed, the center of the crater would probably be different than the center of impact. See the Barringer Crater for more info on this. This impact shows no crater.The circle shown here is at 2.25 kilometers in radius, 4.5  kilometers diameter..The geographic features that comprise this circle are arrowed.



      The 79 km seismic circle. The arrowed areas that define this circle are shown in more detail to the right.


     The Northeastern section of this circle is the most definative. This image is linked to a larger image for more detail.






     The next larger circle is at 822 km radius.



     The Noortheastern part of this circle describes the edge of the coastal bank off Norway.

     Through the Murmansk region of Russia the river follows the line nicely.

   In the South, through Lithuania.




     The circle at 1290 kilometers radius. Bigger is better, click it.










      The 1910 kilometer radius seismic circle. Again the arroewed areas are expanded to the right. Images with a blue edge are linked to larger images.


     There are other circles from this impact.

     In Russia






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© 2017 Terry Westerman