Advisory   If you arrived here by any means other than from the Index of Impacts,
it is suggested that you start at the Introduction to gain an understanding of what follows.


The Himalayan Meteor Impact
The Himalayan Mountains, the Tibetan Plateau, a Massive Meteor Impact.

     The Himalayan Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau were formed by a massive and ancient meteor impact, which sent seismic waves around the Earth. The reminants of these are still clearly visable today as geographic formations which form concentric circles around the Earth.

     It has been theorized that the Himalaya Mountains were formed by continental subduction, when the continental plate which India rests on, floated north from somewhere south, crashed into and was subducted under the Asian continental plate. This pushed the mountains up, forming the Himalayan Mountains.
     Let me say this as gingerly as possible so as not to ruffle anyone’s feathers. That drivel is a bunch of malarkey!  Pangaea is a ridiculous raft of rigmarole that remains from reading maps drawn in the 1800's, where sea monsters were still noted, and the winds coming from fat lipped, chubby cherubs blowing them along. It is tomfoolery, hogwash and poppycock at its' finest.

     If "scientists" are going to project back in time past what we have recorded and can prove repeatedly, let alone thousands, millions or billions of years, then their tales of amazement fall into the same realm as fortelling the future. Pangaea, crystal balls and the marvels of snake oil are all nested kin.

     Pangaea is the kind of skullduggery that keeps the Geo-sciences in the era of dragons and mystic sorcerers. It is hornswoggling  hokey pokey.  It is bamboozling balderdash to entertain the easily beguiled.

    What follows on this page and many others, contradicts and easily refutes that theory rubbish.



     Asia was bombarded with countless meteor impacts. The Himalayan Mountains form the southern rim of a very large and very old meteor impact. If this is the result of plate tectonics, how is it that the Himalayan Mountains are formed in such a perfect circle?  The larger, perfect concentric circles shown below would not be there if the continents had moved.

     See the Introduction for a description of how these circles were made.

     Nearly all of the images on this page are linked to full sized images for a more detailed inspection.

*A note on circle radii measurements. For those trying to duplicate these studies, on the larger circles, the exact radius of the circle is dependant on the direction from which it is measured. As the Earth is not a perfect sphere, the radii on Google Earth takes into consideration that a line measured from the prime meridian to the antimeridian at the Equator, measures 20,037.5 kilometers along the Equator, and 20,005 kilometers over the North Pole. Therefore the radius of the same circle may vary.

The primary ring of the Himalayan Impact, 1635 km in radius.

     This shows the primary ring of the impact, the crater if you prefer. This circle is 1,635 kilometers (1015 miles) in radius.  The impact came in at a steep angle likely from the North northeast. While the impact structure in the south is mostly intact, most of the rest of the circle is only sightly visible, being nearly obliterated by other later strikes, (some shown to the right) most notably on the western side and the southeast. Also, as the meteors most often come down at some angle other then straight down,  the circle in front of the direction of the strike will be much more pronounced than the part of the circle behind the direction of strike. This circle cannot be seen on flat maps because the distortion necessary to draw a nearly spherical Earth on a flat map makes the circle unrecognizable.

       

The Himalayan Impact has been hit by many later meteors. A few are shown.
     The image above is the Himalayan Impact, 1635 kilometer seismic circle, overlaid with several circles showing the locations of impacts that came after the Himalayan. There are many more. These later impacts, broke the form of the Himalayan Impact in many places. Showing the various impacts this way, the reason for the various forms of the geography in the region start to emerge. This also gives the basis for developing an age scale based on the various impacts. The Himalayan must be very old to have been hit this many times after it struck the Earth. If you study this image, you may find many other arcs, parts of circles. If the proper sized circle were to be fitted into those arcs, other impact sites would show themselves.

     Note that the smaller circles appear to be somewhat oval. This is because of the curvature of the Earth being represented in two dimensions. These images are linked to full sized images for further detailed inspection. Each of these circles follow geographic land formations that have been photographed using the finest satellite imagery available today.

The Himalayan Impact, first of the notable seismic circles is at 260 km radius.
     The 260 kilometer radius circle. The center of impact is placed at  41° 17.275'N, 90° 0.687'E. This center is probably not where the meteor ended up, but is the center of the concentric circle shock waves, seismic circles, that emanate from the impact. See the Barringer Impact for a discussion of this. So where is the meteor? Probably it is the Tibetan Plateau, or is under it, causing that area to rise to 5,000 meters elevation, 4,000 meters above the surrounding landscape. This point is where everything rebounded to after impact, and from there the concentric circle, seismic waves emanate. Think of throwing a big rock into the water. The water first parts, making a hole. Then it comes back together, and the expanding perfect circles in the water follow. Afterward there is not much left to see at this point. This image is linked to a much larger image (4800 pixels wide) that details this seismic circle.

The Himalayan Impact Meteor was probably much larger than 230 km in diameter.

If we consider that the Tibetan Plateau is roughly 2,000 kilometers East/West, and 800 kilometers North/South, and that the Tibetan Plateau is about 4,000 meters above the surrounding landscape,
 then: 2000 x 800 x 4 = 6.400,000 cubic kilometers.
If the formula for the volume of a sphere is V = 4/3 πr3,  then 4/3*3.14159*115*115*115 =6370621 cubic kilometers.
 Therefore the meteor would have been about 230 kilometers in diameter, if its' density before impact was the same as that of the Earth.

However, as its' diameter was much smaller than the Earth's, its' gravity would also be much less, in proportion to its' mass.
It is very likely then that its' density was far less before impact, therefore its' size probably was much larger.






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The Himalayan Impact, 3080 kilometer radius, seismic circle.

     This is the 3080 kilometer radius, seismic circle. Details of this circle are to the right. This circle ties all of Asia together, including India before the Himalayan Impact. This and all the following circles have the exact same center point as noted above.         

The Himalayan Impact, 3080 kilometer radius, seismic circle formed the eastern coast of the Caspian Sea.
      The 3080 kilometer radius line runs across the divide of the Caspian sea and the Garabogazkol Basin which is almost centered on the East Coast of the Caspian Sea.. To the north of the Caspian sea, the Ural River follows the line closely.

Through China and Hong Kong, the Himalayan Impact, 3080 kilometer radius, seismic circle.
     In southeastern China, the circle line follows the ridge line for 1,000 kilometers. It passed directly through Hong Kong, detailed in the image to the right. Also on the Island of Hainan.

Through Hong Kong the Himalayan seismic wave carved a specific path at 3080 km from center
     This circle cuts a very specific line through Hong Kong at 3080 km..

India, the River Krishna, paralells the seismic wave from the Himalayan Impact at 3080 km.
     Through India the seismic line is clear. Just to the south of the line is the River Krishna. This line firmly places India here since sometime before the Himalayan Impact occurred.  This image is from an effective altitude of 700 kilometers.  In the lower right of the image is another impact of about 140 km in radius.



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     The 4045 kilometer radius seismic circle, circles Asia and forms the western coast of Saudi Arabia along the Persian Gulf.                                                 


     Along the western coast of the Persian Gulf and through Iraq, defining the Tigris River.


     Through Russia, just east of Moscow, and along the line of lakes to the north.


     In Northeastern Russia, through the States of Sakha and Khabarovsk Krai.


     In Eastern Russia, matching the coastline of the island Sakhalinskaya. Then down the Sea of Japan and crossing Japan at Lake Biwa, near Kyoto.


      Past the Philippines and through the South China Sea.

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    At 5135 kilometers radius.


     Through western Saudi Arabia, and nicely forming the northeastern coast of the Red Sea.


     Nobody has ever heard of Svalbard. But here it is, an island between Greenland and Russia.


     Across the Philippine Basin and the Perce Vela Basin of the western Pacific Ocean.

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     The 5770 kilometer radius seismic circle.


     Through Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt. This seismic circle is the first to tie Africa in its' place since before the Himalayan Impact. If Africa had moved, the markings on the Earth noted here, would not be here.


     The same circle line defines the western coast of Greece. 

     Shown also is an impact that provided the primary form for the Greek Islands. The center of impact is marked by the red dot, at 37° 56.694'N, 25° 7.543'E


     This line extends through Denmark and Norway with notable geographic markings.


     Then over the top through Chukotka Autonomous Okrug in far Northeastern Russia.


     Then down around through Indonesia.

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       The 7990 kilometer seismic circle through Africa. The areas circled in red are detailed to the right.


The west bank of Lake Rakwa aligns specifically to the Himalayan impact seismic wave at  7990 km.
     In Tanzania, this line carves the northeastern coast of Lake Rakwa precisely. Lake Tanganyika is to the Northwest and Lake Malawi is to the Southeast.

The Ulindi River, a tributary to the Congo River in the D. R. Congo follows the Himalayan seismic wave precisely at 9770 km from center of impact.
     The line is scribed quite well by the Ulindi River (or is it the other way around?), a tributary to the Congo River in the D. R. Congo.


     Through Algeria.


 The 7990 kilometer radius circle through North America. The red circle is detailed to the right. This part of the circle places the North American Continent at this exact same place since before the Himalayan Impact.


     Through the Yukon Territories, Western Canada.


     Through the Pacific Ocean, past the Hawaiian Islands.


     The 7990 kilometer radius circle through Australia. This part of the circle places Australia at this same spot since before the Himalayan Impact. 


     The 7990 kilometer radius circle detailed through Western Australia and the Northern Territories.

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      The 9770 kilometer seismic circle through Africa. The area circled in red are detailed to the right.


     Through Angola.


     The 9770 kilometer seismic circle through North America. The areas circled in red are detailed to the right.


     Through Washington State, past Mt. St. Helen’s and Mt. Adams. Various lakes and rivers are noted along the line.


Through Washington State, Idaho and Montana cutting at Marias Pass.


The Darling River in Australia was aligned by the Himalayan seismic wave at 9770 km from center of impact.
The Darling River in southeastern Australia lines up quite nicely with this circle for more than 900 kilometers.

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The Himalayan Impact, 12,505 kilometer seismic circle past New Zealand.
      The 12,505 kilometer seismic circle past New Zealand and North into the Pacific. The area circled in red are detailed to the right.

New Zealand was aligned by the Himalayan Seismic Wave at 12,505 km. from center
     12,505 kilometers past New Zealand.


     In the Pacific Ocean, note Pago Pago on the left.

The Himalayan Impact, 12,505 kilometer seismic circle through Mexico and the Mid Atlantic Ocean.
      The 12,505 kilometer seismic circle through Mexico and the Mid Atlantic Ocean. The area circled in red are detailed to the right.

The Himalayan Impact, 12,505 kilometer seismic circle through Mexico.

The Himalayan Impact, 12,505 kilometer seismic circle through the Mid Atlantic Ocean.
      The 12,505 kilometer seismic circle through the Mid Atlantic Ocean. The area boxed in red is detailed to the right.

The Himalayan Impact, 12,505 kilometer seismic circle through the Mid Atlantic Ocean.

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Himalayan Impact seismic circle at 18,260 km. from center forms a part of the Sala and Gomez Fracture Zone, and the Antipode was possibly responsible for the Valvida Fracture Zone.
      At 18,260 kilometers from the center of impact, this circle is formed. In the North is the Sala y Gomez Fracture Zone. The circle then curves through Chile and Argentina. The Himalayan Impact Antipode is placed at 41° 17.295'S  89° 59.304'W, near the center of the Valvidia Fracture Zone.

The Sala and Gomez Fracture Zone, the Roggeveen Basin, and Robinson Crusoe Island.
     The northern section of the 18,260 mile seismic circle across the Sala y Gomez Fracture Zone. Note Robinson Crusoe Island  circled to the lower right.

Himalayan Impact seismic circle at 18,260 km. through Chile and Argentina.
     Through Chile and Argentina.

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twest@geoledgers.com

Index of Impact Sites

Introduction

© 2014 Terry Westerman